Towards a Better Roguelike: How to Tell a Story

The vast majority of roguelikes don’t have any sort of plot at all. Or, at least, only the most basic bare bones of one. More of a framing story, something to explain what’s going on on only the most surface level. Going all the way back to the original Rogue, where you are simply trying to retrieve the Amulet of Yendor. Often, they run along those lines, get to the end of this dungeon and either retrieve this artifact or kill this evil wizard or whatever.

story5

Continue reading “Towards a Better Roguelike: How to Tell a Story”

Towards a Better Roguelike: Breaking Down the JRPG

I said in my first post that I wanted to make a roguelike JRPG. But what does that even mean, exactly? What are the fundamental features that make a game a JRPG? How could those best be translated into the traditional roguelike framework? What do they bring to the table in terms of clarity and flexibility?

jrpg1

Good questions, all. Let’s get into it! Continue reading “Towards a Better Roguelike: Breaking Down the JRPG”

Towards a Better Roguelike: Types of Randomness

Roguelikes are a genre defined by randomness. It’s the primary thing that sets them apart from other games. Even when they’re not really RPGs at all, a roguelike will have a level that is randomly generated. Or rather, what is called “procedural generation”, because true randomness is like a whole thing involving complicated mathematics that I’m not even gonna get into.

rando1

Randomness is something that should be used carefully, though. Especially when it comes to actual gameplay, it’s easy to lean on it too much and end up with a mess of a game. You can’t get away with making absolutely everything random, the chances of getting something that’s even playable are tiny. Continue reading “Towards a Better Roguelike: Types of Randomness”

Towards a Better Roguelike: Getting Started

I’ve been working on developing a video game for the past year or so.

It’s something that’s very important to me, a passionate pursuit that saved me from the depths of despair, way back when. But, progress has come in fits and starts. I learned to use Unity, found that I absolutely hated it, switched to Godot, and have been messing around with that for a while now.

roguelike1

Most of the work I do, though, is actually just writing. Brainstorming ideas for the setting, gameplay, various sorts of intricate systems. In physical notebooks and in dozens of different documents on my computer. Writing away, planning and planning for all sorts of different things.

So, as long as I’m doing this, I thought I’d write a bit of my thoughts about game design here, on my blog. Let’s get into it! Continue reading “Towards a Better Roguelike: Getting Started”